History

 

The National Association of Neighborhoods was founded in 1975 by the leadership of America's community councils, neighborhood coalitions, and block clubs, and by concerned individuals united in their determination to improve the quality of life in the nation's neighborhoods.

NAN is one of the largest and oldest multi-issue membership associations of grass-roots neighborhood organizations. The Association's growth is due to its unique approach to neighborhood problem solving. We listen; listen to the voices of wisdom and experience that live in the communities we represent and serve. We seek to identify emerging issues and to tackle persistent problems.

In a quarter of a century, the Association has addressed significant neighborhood social and economic empowerment issues. Some of NAN's major projects and accomplishments include:

• Organized one of the first conferences on ways to stop predatory lending, working in partnership with The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and The National Fair Housing Alliance

• Worked with the grass-roots leadership of the nation's empowerment zones to stimulate retail and housing opportunities

• Created national models for neighborhood inter-modal transportation systems

• Worked with the leadership of neighborhood churches, small businesses and non-profit organizations to identify benefits and the means to access them from electric deregulation

• Worked with local neighborhood leadership and other national organizations to establish neighborhood leadership training institutes

• Created the first National Center for Neighborhood-Based Service Delivery

• Work with the leadership of neighborhood coalitions, and of the private and public sectors to reduce nuclear high-level waste from proximity to neighborhoods

• Create neighborhood crime prevention models

• Help neighborhood leadership develop practical and short-term economic empowerment projects
 

NAN has worked with Republican and Democratic Administrations, with members of Congress, governors, mayors and other local leaders of both political parties on critical issues for the future of America's neighborhoods. The Association has held national conventions, unique because they provide an opportunity for grass-roots leaders to discuss, with each other, issues of importance and strategies that are successful in attacking economic, social, environmental, health and safety problems.

The Association's history is one of successful issue dialogue and problem solving. It is a living history with an ongoing vision: one in which the leadership of federal, state, county and city entities join with the leadership and membership of vibrant grass-roots organizations to better the heart of the nation's community: America's Neighborhoods.

NAN Corporate Roundtable
Sharing our commitment to make all of America’s neighborhoods better places to live and work